Sarah’s Key

If you want to read a bestseller, just wait a few years after its hay day until it finds its way into Goodwills and used book stores. The book you are looking for is guaranteed to pop up, because it will be bought as gifts and recycled through office Christmas parties. If it’s sad? Even better, because people don’t tend to hang on to books that make them uncomfortable unless it also dramatically changed their world view. That’s why after I write this review, I’ll be doing the same and sending Tatiana de Rosney’s Sarah’s Key to its next life by donating.

I picked up Sarah’s Key at a fancy Goodwill that printed labels for each item. I was drawn to the story because it reminded me of the books I used to be obsessed with in middle school–the stories of Jewish young women trying desperately to escape the fate of the Nazis. From Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars to The Diary of Anne Frank, even not too long ago I had dove into Marcus Zusak’s The Book Thief–all of these works had been compelling for their glimpse into trauma and tragedy from the point of view of a child. With so much acclaim, Sarah’s Key seemed like the natural progression to reading more into the Holocaust genre of literature.

In One Sentence: A journalist must research the historic (and near undocumented) Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup, in which French police arrested thousands of Jews to send to concentration camps, and ends up connecting to the story of a young girl who tried to escape to save her family.

Favorite Line: “What was wrong with being a Jew? Why did some people hate Jews? Her father scratched his head, had looked down at her with a quizzical smile. He had said, hesitatingly, ‘Because they think we are different. So they are frightened of us.’ But what was different? thought the girl. What was so different?” – p. 88

Review: Sarah’s Key has two parallel story lines: young Sarah as she escapes a camp outside of Paris to reunite with her brother who she has locked in the closet and Julia, a married woman who in discovering the story of Sarah also deals with a crumbling marriage. It’s an interesting structure to play with how the past can change us in unexpected ways. I loved every passage dedicated to Sarah’s story, and while the moments it spilled into Julia’s worked well–I never quite felt as captured by Julia’s journey. By the second half of the novel, it’s really all about Julia. In a way, I understand why. In many ways, Julia directly connects with the reader as she learns of Sarah’s story at the same time and her response helps the reader reflect on their own. On the other hand, it’s also like having a built in commentator. Julia’s perspective shapes how we understand Sarah’s. I completely understand why this book has so much praise, but I wouldn’t recommend this book against others in the genre that made me feel more connected to the protagonists.

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: either Julia had taken another assignment or Sarah let her brother be captured.

More on the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup:

Entrance to the Vel’ d’Hiv (The Winter Stadium) where Jews were detained en mass before being deported

NY Times: France Reflects on Its Role in Wartime Fate of Jews  (2012)

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The Diary of a Teenage Girl

Image result for the diary of a teenage girl book

I was in a used book store in Berkeley, CA and looking for a graphic novel. The store, though expansive, strangely did not have Art Speigelman’s Maus, which is on my reading bucket list. As I searched through the spines, I decided to look for what else was out there. Phoebe Gloeckner’s The Diary of a Teenage Girl stood out. It was a piece promising the best in multi-genre: hybrid fiction and graphic memoir. 

I had just finished the amazing Fun Home by Alison Bechdel, and while it was clear this book would be very different–there is something intriguing about the childhood of an aspiring female cartoonist growing up in a man’s world. Admittedly, though I was at a used book store, the pricing was still a bit steep since the book was in good condition (retail: $18.95, used book store: $14.97). But it was a book in a unique genre about a girl growing up in San Francisco Bay Area–so in a way I was really celebrating this trip to Berkeley, wasn’t I?

Image result for shut up and take my money

In One Sentence: A teenage girl grows up in San Francisco in the 1970s during a time of a lot of sex and drugs.

Favorite Line: “I love Monroe. Sometimes I watch him as he sleeps, and I feel so much love for him that my heart feels like it might burst. I wish that the minute he comes of the plane I could run up to him and hug him tight. But I can’t, darnit, because my mother will be there. It’s just not right that we have to hide our affection. Do you think it’s right? Or do you think that Monroe is just some old lecher who is taking advantage of me? And if he’s not taking advantage of me, do you think it’s a horrible sin all the same? I wish Monroe had a diary so you could read both sides of the situation and tell me what’s what.” – p. 142 – 144

Review: This is similar to The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian in that both are roughly based on the real life story of the authors. Phoebe Gloeckner shares exerts of her real teenage diary at the end of the book, and it’s clear that the line between the protagonist Minnie and Phoebe is pretty thin. So while there isn’t a lot of movement in the story (but there is a lot of sex. A LOT OF SEX. If that’s what you’re into.), the reader gets a close meditation on what growing up means to this young woman. As Minnie spirals into sexual relationships with multiple partners, abuses drugs and alcohol to fix her depression, and generally makes other unhealthy and unsafe decisions–her voice is so intelligent and strong, you can’t help but know that if she survives adolescence, she can survive anything. I loved how the images and comics enhanced the story and overall the ending pulls off something resembling closure. For those looking for strong feminine voices, this is the book for you. However, don’t expect any catharsis. Does anyone get that while they are in high school?

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: there was never an affair between Minnie and Minnie’s mother’s boyfriend, Monroe.

Dramatic Adaptations:

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The original cast of The Diary of a Teenage Girl: The Play

Before the book was made into a movie, it was first adapted into a play! Writer/ director of the 2015 film adaptation Marielle Heller created the off-Broadway play in 2010 in which she also starred as Minnie Goetz. I love this interview with Indiewire in which Heller explains her decision to turn the novel into theater and later into film:

INDIEWIRE: How did you come to write the play?

HELLER: I wanted to play the part. I felt connected, felt she was in my bones. I was connected to the theater, it was my first love, where my career was focused, on interesting ways to tell stories. I had no plans to do it as a film. It wasn’t until I ended the play and let it die–they end and vanish–that I realized I wasn’t finished with it and thought of doing it as a film. It was not my original plan.

 

 

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The End of the Affair

Image result for the end of the affair graham greene

Sometimes, I find a book in a place unexpected. On a hot Saturday earlier this summer, I went to the Museum of Broken Relationships. The museum is essentially a collection of objects donated by people across the US. Each object represents a relationship since passed–whether romantic, platonic, or even with the self. Walking through the space, reading the stories of so many painful memories, it just made me want more.

The museum’s gift shop had quirky magnets and tote bags, but of course I was drawn to the book section. Between summer reads and hard-core classics, I chose the classic The End of the Affair by Graham Greene for two reasons: 1) it wasn’t very long and 2) John Updike and William Golding had recommendations on the back cover.  

In One Sentence: A writer pines for a lost relationship.

Favorite Line: “I thought, sometimes I’ve hated Maurice, but would I have hated him if I hadn’t loved him too? Oh God, if I could really hate you, what would that mean?” – p. 89

Review: The End of the Affair is a well-crafted and introspective piece of fiction. With some autobiographical nods (Graham Greene wrote this after the end of his own illicit affair and even vaguely dedicates the book to who might be his former lover), there is a feeling of emotional truth to the main character’s struggle to work on his next novel through the turmoil. The novel takes place two years after the affair between Maurice and Sarah has ended. The characters are sad and bitter, and while this can easily fall into gloomsday reading, there is always an undercurrent of hope that the pain will go away. In the end, this book turns out more to be about a broken relationship with society and God, which ultimately makes this work timeless. For readers that sunk their teeth into Maugham and Fitzgerald, Greene is the writer for you.

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: Sarah was less superstitious and listened to a medical doctor.

More on the Museum of Broken Relationships: 

Article from NPR in 2016: “Art of Breakups: Museum Enshrines Relics of Relationships Past” 

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Back to Blogging

Reasons I haven’t been book blogging:

  1. I’ve been writing more than I’ve been reading.
  2. What I have read has been online or, in an attempt to support local writers and bookstores, I’ve been buying books at FULL PRICE.
  3. I’m an unreliable narrator.

So, I’m back for now?

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Ron Carlson Writes a Story

Ron-Carlson-Writes-a-Story

In college, there’s a whole culture of buying, selling, and trading new and used books. In fact, there are some professors who assign books with no binding just to decrease the cost of the book (and in turn, increase the cost by not having a used copy to be found.) So, as I jump back into blogging, I’ve decided to take on a new genre in nonfiction — the book on writing — and the used college textbook.

Used college books are terrible examples of bargain book hunting. Sure, if you’re shopping online it’s one thing, but at UC Irvine the bookstore themselves sold books in new and used form. I was a lazy online shopper, so I often succumbed to the yellow USED labeling that knocked down book prices by a few dollars. On the bright side, while being an English major meant purchasing about ten books every ten weeks, the books were usually novels, short stories, or could easily be used with older editions. Unlike science, math, or any practical degree.

Every writing student at UC Irvine has to read one book: Ron Carlson’s Ron Carlson Writes a Story. Largely, because Ron Carlson directs the graduate program and it ties in nicely to the writing pedagogy of the school.

In One Sentence: …Ron Carlson writes a story.

Favorite Line: “The single largest advantage a veteran writer has over the beginner is this tolerance for not knowing.” – p. 15

Review: I was fortunate enough at Irvine to take a few classes with Ron Carlson. Being in the room with a writer is infinitely more rewarding to learning their process than anything they could write. Perhaps ironic given the profession. There was one day when he talked about writing the book. A student interjected that everyone had been required to read it. Carlson asked, “what’d you think? Was it a useful?” The student paused, smiled, and Carlson laughed himself. “Don’t tell me. I don’t want to know.” He acknowledged the question that learning about writing through reading about writing is sort of a moot strategy. You have to write. You have to write and write and write. Ron Carlson Writes a Story is about a writer learning about writing as he writes — to tell the reader exactly what he needs to know. Stop reading. Start writing. I’d recommend this book for pieces of writing inspiration, but as far as seeing deeply into a writing process I’d put Stephen King’s On Writing on a higher pedestal if only for the intimacy into King’s commitment and personal struggles. Carlson never goes too deeply into his own life as a writer, except to say that he’s having fun on the page. Maybe that’s all he needs to say on the subject. A useful book, but not required of every writer.

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner If: Ron Carlson almost wrote a story.

Now, Read Ron Carlson:

http://www.webdelsol.com/CLR/works/carlson_pirate.htm

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King Dork

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There’s only a handful of required reading texts that actually relate and stick with high school students. Undoubtedly, J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye should be on the top of the list. It’s a book people loved or hated, but either way anyone could get through in only a few sittings. (Unlike the much shorter, but denser, The Scarlet Letter.) And why is that? Because of the narrator, Holden Caulfield’s, clear, unapologetic voice.

The best young adult fiction is all about voice. I found Frank Portman’s King Dork, an “impossibly brilliant” “myspace generation” version of Catcher cult, at a Goodwill Bookstore. Besides the rave reviews, I was drawn to the nature of how the narrator’s voice read across the pages I skimmed. It was bold, youthful, authentic. And I was one who had loved Catcher; why wouldn’t I like this book too?

In One Sentence: Boy rebels against Catcher in the Rye rebellion.

Favorite Line: “[The Catcher in the Rye] is every teacher’s favorite book. The main guy is a kind of misfit kid superhero named Holden Caulfield. For teachers, he is the ultimate guy, a real dreamboat. They love him to pieces. They all want to have sex with him, and with the book’s author, too, and they’d probably even try to do it with the book itself if they could figure out a way to go about it. It changed their lives when they were young. As kids, they carried it with them everywhere they went. They solemnly resolved that, when they grew up, they would dedicate their lives to spreading The Word.” — pg. 12

Review: King Dork follows “Chi-Mo” through a high school year with a murder mystery, sex, battle of the band scenes, and more. He finds his father’s annotated copy of Catcher and attempts to decipher codes inside. At the same time, other shenanigans ensue.  It’s a fun story about a kid who’s struggling against all of the adults in his life, not unlike Holden Caulfield. The humor in the book works really well against “Chi-Mo’s” strong voice. It’s also an interesting contemplation at the end with the conclusions the narrator comes through — he asks the questions of what he learned and reflects on how people piece together their own perceptions to form new conclusions. There were moments that dragged, and while each new “band name” was funny, it’s hard for me to read about music. Kind of a taste thing. If you like Catcher, this book is a must. Though, it will probably take more sittings just because the tension doesn’t carry the same way it does in Salinger’s classic.

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: “Chi-Mo” sparknoted.

Glossary:

The book had a glossary. Written by the narrator! An even better example of voice. Here is my favorite–

epigraph (a-PIG-rape):

an obscure quotations at the beginning of a book designed to make the author of the book seem smarter and more well-read than its readers. An epigraph that doesn’t make the reader feel confused, small, worthless, and stupid is an epigraph that has failed. Therefore, the best epigraphs have no discernible relationship to the contents of the books they adorn. 

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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Technically, Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is public domain. So the fact that I paid any money for it (even if it was just $1.50) should perhaps not be considered a “bargain.” But, hey, it covers the printing cost, right?

I picked up this book in a normal college book store in the “thrift” section where all the public domain classics are reprinted for student reference. (Dracula, Hunchback, etc.) I was drawn to it after I studied abroad and got to spend a few days in Edinburgh, Scotland. Walking through the city streets, I stumbled upon a small “Writer’s Museum” chronicling the lives of famous Scottish writers. Really — it was only about Robert Louis Stevenson. Who didn’t even stay in Scotland — he travelled to the Pacific and spent time on the Hawaiian islands and then settling in Samoa. He even spent time on Molokai with Father Damien in the leper colonies.

I guess the truth is I didn’t purchase Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde because I wanted to read a good story. (Though, it was a perk.) I saw the book and I remember thinking about what I had learned about the writer and I wanted to know how his imagination worked.

In One Sentence: A doctor devises a chemical to expel himself of moral struggle.

Favorite Line: He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age or colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent, and about as emotional as a bagpipe.” — p.3

Review: Only about sixty pages, this novella is interesting in how it wraps up the mystery of events and persons through telling the story through a limited perspective. The details focus on characters and their complexities, which makes sense when the big reveal is how these complexities are the driving point to why Dr. Jekyll seeks change. This is classic horror — tense, crying children, don’t go in a dark room, horror. So, read it if you haven’t. What this book does very well is establishing universal motivations in what would otherwise be despicable people. The main character, Dr. Jekyll’s friend and lawyer, wants to see Jekyll happy and rational. Jekyll struggles with his humanity and wants more than anything in the world to not struggle anymore. Isn’t that what we all want?

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner If: Dr. Jekyll had my chemistry skills. (aka NONE.)

Adaptation:

Like any classic, there are many adaptations that have come since. Here is one of my favorite “Mr. Hyde’s”.

From the film The Mask (1994).

What’s your favorite adaptation?

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