Tag Archives: Young Adult

King Dork

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There’s only a handful of required reading texts that actually relate and stick with high school students. Undoubtedly, J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye should be on the top of the list. It’s a book people loved or hated, but either way anyone could get through in only a few sittings. (Unlike the much shorter, but denser, The Scarlet Letter.) And why is that? Because of the narrator, Holden Caulfield’s, clear, unapologetic voice.

The best young adult fiction is all about voice. I found Frank Portman’s King Dork, an “impossibly brilliant” “myspace generation” version of Catcher cult, at a Goodwill Bookstore. Besides the rave reviews, I was drawn to the nature of how the narrator’s voice read across the pages I skimmed. It was bold, youthful, authentic. And I was one who had loved Catcher; why wouldn’t I like this book too?

In One Sentence: Boy rebels against Catcher in the Rye rebellion.

Favorite Line: “[The Catcher in the Rye] is every teacher’s favorite book. The main guy is a kind of misfit kid superhero named Holden Caulfield. For teachers, he is the ultimate guy, a real dreamboat. They love him to pieces. They all want to have sex with him, and with the book’s author, too, and they’d probably even try to do it with the book itself if they could figure out a way to go about it. It changed their lives when they were young. As kids, they carried it with them everywhere they went. They solemnly resolved that, when they grew up, they would dedicate their lives to spreading The Word.” — pg. 12

Review: King Dork follows “Chi-Mo” through a high school year with a murder mystery, sex, battle of the band scenes, and more. He finds his father’s annotated copy of Catcher and attempts to decipher codes inside. At the same time, other shenanigans ensue.  It’s a fun story about a kid who’s struggling against all of the adults in his life, not unlike Holden Caulfield. The humor in the book works really well against “Chi-Mo’s” strong voice. It’s also an interesting contemplation at the end with the conclusions the narrator comes through — he asks the questions of what he learned and reflects on how people piece together their own perceptions to form new conclusions. There were moments that dragged, and while each new “band name” was funny, it’s hard for me to read about music. Kind of a taste thing. If you like Catcher, this book is a must. Though, it will probably take more sittings just because the tension doesn’t carry the same way it does in Salinger’s classic.

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: “Chi-Mo” sparknoted.

Glossary:

The book had a glossary. Written by the narrator! An even better example of voice. Here is my favorite–

epigraph (a-PIG-rape):

an obscure quotations at the beginning of a book designed to make the author of the book seem smarter and more well-read than its readers. An epigraph that doesn’t make the reader feel confused, small, worthless, and stupid is an epigraph that has failed. Therefore, the best epigraphs have no discernible relationship to the contents of the books they adorn. 

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The Giver

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Sometimes I need a book for a specific purpose and I’m forced to splurge. After college, I got a job tutoring writing for middle school students. I came up with prompts teaching techniques of literature analysis and went seeking a book that would hopefully inspire ideas and get them excited about the project. Okay, honesty moment? I bought Lois Lowry’s The Giver for five dollars at my favorite used book store “Book Off”. I used it a little in my tutoring, but ended up switching to The Hunger Games.

Even though The Giver has a slower buildup and payoff for a dystopian fable, I didn’t regret the purchase. I hadn’t read it myself. In sixth grade, my teacher read it to me but looking back this is absolutely the wrong book to read aloud. The transitions between past and present bleed into each other, and if you’re only half-listening it can get rather confusing. Luckily, rediscovering the young adult novel in my twenties gave me a new opportunity to appreciate the message of the story. Plus, catch up before the new movie comes out! (We’ll get to that later…)

In One Sentence: In a “perfect” new world, a young boy is assigned to become the new host for all of society’s memories.

Favorite Line: “I liked the feeling of love,” [Jonas] confessed… “Of course,’ he added quickly, ‘I do understand that it wouldn’t work very well. And that it’s much better to be organized the way we are now. I can see that it was a dangerous way to live.'” – p. 126

Review: Looking at dystopia through the eyes of a twelve year old is interesting because that time of your life is all about the transition from accepting the world as it is and questioning it. This book has a clear message on the importance of memory, that it is something to be treasured, but takes a different turn when it can only be harnessed by one person. Most of the book is just defining the rules of this world and the underbelly that the main character Jonas discovers to be less than perfect. Because it’s a complete new society, and a lot of the work is in integrating the reader into the world, I found the characters very awkward with each other. BUT as Jonas gained more wisdom, he became less awkward — less formal — more confident in lying. It’s an unlikely future, but begs the reader to think about ‘what if?’ The ending isn’t totally satisfying, but I recommend it as a Bucket List classic. Then, you can switch to Hunger Games.

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner If: Jonas’s father decided not to nurse baby Gabriel at home.

Coming to Theaters:

Thoughts:

1. Why is most of this movie in color?!

2. Jeff Bridges. Phew.

3. Did they just show a possible ending?

4. Prediction: the rules of the world will be like the book, but they’ll add lots more conflict.

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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

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There’s a reason why coming-of-age stories remain staples in literature. Whether it is through classic like Catcher in the Rye, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Outsiders or modern tales such as Youth in Revolt — we read these books early or late in life, and either way when we are finished they stay preserved on our bookshelves. They are the books you read, and you see yourself. 

Did you know there are Goodwills EXCLUSIVELY for books? No clothes. No VCRs. Just books. I drove by one with my family off of Foothill Blvd between the Walmart shopping center and a closed tavern. I found about four or five books that cost about ten dollars total. One was Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. I had recognized the name from writer’s quotes and short stories, but had not read any of his novels.  It seemed like an interesting find – a funny novel filled with comics like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, except with more awards and, hopefully, poignancy.

In One Sentence: A junior high cartoonist leaves his Indian Reservation school for better opportunities at an all-white school.

Favorite Line: “It sucks to be poor, and it sucks to feel that you somehow deserve to be poor. You start believing that you’re poor because you’re stupid and ugly. And then you start believing you’re stupid and ugly because you’re Indian. And because you’re Indian you start believing you’re destined to be poor. It’s an ugly circle and there’s nothing you can do about it. Poverty doesn’t give you strength or teach you lessons about perseverance. No, poverty only teaches you how to be poor.” – pg 13

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Review: A young boy has to deal with the natural struggle of identity but with the added complications of being the only Indian in an all-white school. He becomes the outcast not only in his new school, but also to his friends back home who see him as a  “part-time Indian.” Hilarious. Hard to put down. Totally inspiring in its ability to make you laugh and cry at the same time. This novel is all about voice. It masterfully captures the voice of the narrator and main protagonist, Junior. “Literary fiction” usually sets a certain expectation for a caliber of language, but there is also so much control and craft in a writer’s ability to create a convincing voice. Part of this success in Sherman Alexie’s novel is due to his own admittance that much of the text is auto-biographical, from his experience growing up on an Indian Reservation. I’ve come to discover that the best forms of art are not necessarily about a central theme or overall impact on society, but about honesty. Even in fiction, if I can feel a writer’s true intention and honesty – I’ll likely remember that book for the rest of my life. Everyone should read this book. Most importantly at schools where, unfortunately, it has been banned.

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner if: People were more willing to look for things they had in common, rather than what made them different.

Banned: Throughout the country this book has been introduced into middle school curriculum, cursed by parents, and then swiftly banned (sometimes removed as required reading, other times taken out of libraries all together.) Why? The narrator, as a prepubescent boy, talks about masturbation. Watch Sherman Alexie’s reaction:

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A Girl’s Life Online

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I have a weakness for Lifetime movies and Young Adult novels in the way that I also crave fast food. I know they won’t be the best quality, the most satisfying, or necessarily make me a better person – but they will hit the spot. Katherine Tarbox’s autobiography A Girl’s Life Online or Katie.com was one of those finds I knew would be a quick and interesting read, especially for someone like myself who grew up in the age of internet predator fear. This is another $1.00 Book Off find, but from the non-fiction aisle.

In One Sentence: A thirteen year old girl meets a man online, who turns out to not be who he says he is.

Favorite Line: “I can’t tell you what all thirteen-year-old girls are like, but I can tell you what I was like.” – p. 1

Review: The book tells the story of Katie’s developing relationship with the man online, “Mark”, from their first online conversation to the results of Mark’s court trial. The book succeeds in not only exploring Katie’s own changing feelings for Mark, as trust is built and destroyed, but also in how Katie is able to see her own accountability in the events. Ultimately, the online relationship not only causes friction with her family, but also her swim team, her community, and even with how Katie sees herself. I think this is an important cautionary story for teens and would recommend it, especially for young people or students that may not enjoy reading. It’s definitely a page-turner.

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner If: Katie was never on the swim team and did a less competitive/traveling sport. Like badminton.

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