Monthly Archives: December 2014

King Dork

King_Dork_cover (1)

There’s only a handful of required reading texts that actually relate and stick with high school students. Undoubtedly, J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye should be on the top of the list. It’s a book people loved or hated, but either way anyone could get through in only a few sittings. (Unlike the much shorter, but denser, The Scarlet Letter.) And why is that? Because of the narrator, Holden Caulfield’s, clear, unapologetic voice.

The best young adult fiction is all about voice. I found Frank Portman’s King Dork, an “impossibly brilliant” “myspace generation” version of Catcher cult, at a Goodwill Bookstore. Besides the rave reviews, I was drawn to the nature of how the narrator’s voice read across the pages I skimmed. It was bold, youthful, authentic. And I was one who had loved Catcher; why wouldn’t I like this book too?

In One Sentence: Boy rebels against Catcher in the Rye rebellion.

Favorite Line: “[The Catcher in the Rye] is every teacher’s favorite book. The main guy is a kind of misfit kid superhero named Holden Caulfield. For teachers, he is the ultimate guy, a real dreamboat. They love him to pieces. They all want to have sex with him, and with the book’s author, too, and they’d probably even try to do it with the book itself if they could figure out a way to go about it. It changed their lives when they were young. As kids, they carried it with them everywhere they went. They solemnly resolved that, when they grew up, they would dedicate their lives to spreading The Word.” — pg. 12

Review: King Dork follows “Chi-Mo” through a high school year with a murder mystery, sex, battle of the band scenes, and more. He finds his father’s annotated copy of Catcher and attempts to decipher codes inside. At the same time, other shenanigans ensue.  It’s a fun story about a kid who’s struggling against all of the adults in his life, not unlike Holden Caulfield. The humor in the book works really well against “Chi-Mo’s” strong voice. It’s also an interesting contemplation at the end with the conclusions the narrator comes through — he asks the questions of what he learned and reflects on how people piece together their own perceptions to form new conclusions. There were moments that dragged, and while each new “band name” was funny, it’s hard for me to read about music. Kind of a taste thing. If you like Catcher, this book is a must. Though, it will probably take more sittings just because the tension doesn’t carry the same way it does in Salinger’s classic.

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: “Chi-Mo” sparknoted.

Glossary:

The book had a glossary. Written by the narrator! An even better example of voice. Here is my favorite–

epigraph (a-PIG-rape):

an obscure quotations at the beginning of a book designed to make the author of the book seem smarter and more well-read than its readers. An epigraph that doesn’t make the reader feel confused, small, worthless, and stupid is an epigraph that has failed. Therefore, the best epigraphs have no discernible relationship to the contents of the books they adorn. 

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