Tag Archives: Kurt Vonnegut

Slaughterhouse Five, or The Children’s Crusade

slaughterhousefive

This was my first dive into Vonnegut. There was another time, the year after college, when I sat outside of a library with a coworker handing out flyers and he read me a passage from another Vonnegut novel but I don’t think that counts because I can’t remember what it was or what was said except for the fact that it touched him deeply (the coworker, and probably Vonnegut too). I found a tattered 1960s edition of Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.’s Slaughterhouse Five at a Goodwill. The yellow Goodwill sticker priced it at $2.99; inside from another thrift store was scribbled $3.00. Not much of a cut down if you ask me.

I wasn’t sure what it was about. Of course, I had heard of it, but it seemed to be a book you see more often on a reading list with no summary of plot, simply a detail of its notoriety in literary history. But, I’ve read it now, and all I can say is I understand why there is a whole school of writers studying Vonnegut.

In One Sentence: A writer tells the story of the Dresden Bombings through a man who has become unstuck in time after an alien abduction.

Favorite Line: “He did not think of himself as a writer for the simple reason that the world had never allowed him to think of himself in this way.” – p.150

Review: I didn’t expect to get as sucked in as I did. Such an interesting humor and perspective on people and the world. It begins with a writer, perhaps Vonnegut or maybe an unnamed Narrator, telling his friends about the book he is writing on Dresden. Then, we dive into the main story — Billy Armstrong’s story — as he travels through his own timeline full of war, death, and love after an alien abduction. The strange thing is is that this is not a science fiction story, not really. More precisely, it’s a story about telling stories as the reader feels Vonnegut circumnavigating the retelling of his own Dresden experience. And everyone who cares about reading or writing should pick this up.

This describes perfectly my feelings on this book:

nothinghurt

The Book Would Have Ended A Lot Sooner If: there were no survivors after the plane crash.

Actual Favorite Line: “She was a dull person, but a sensational invitation to make babies. Men looked at her and wanted to fill her up with babies right away.” – p. 152

 

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