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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The_Strange_Case_of_Dr_Jekyll_and_Mr_Hyde

Technically, Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is public domain. So the fact that I paid any money for it (even if it was just $1.50) should perhaps not be considered a “bargain.” But, hey, it covers the printing cost, right?

I picked up this book in a normal college book store in the “thrift” section where all the public domain classics are reprinted for student reference. (Dracula, Hunchback, etc.) I was drawn to it after I studied abroad and got to spend a few days in Edinburgh, Scotland. Walking through the city streets, I stumbled upon a small “Writer’s Museum” chronicling the lives of famous Scottish writers. Really — it was only about Robert Louis Stevenson. Who didn’t even stay in Scotland — he travelled to the Pacific and spent time on the Hawaiian islands and then settling in Samoa. He even spent time on Molokai with Father Damien in the leper colonies.

I guess the truth is I didn’t purchase Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde because I wanted to read a good story. (Though, it was a perk.) I saw the book and I remember thinking about what I had learned about the writer and I wanted to know how his imagination worked.

In One Sentence: A doctor devises a chemical to expel himself of moral struggle.

Favorite Line: He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age or colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent, and about as emotional as a bagpipe.” — p.3

Review: Only about sixty pages, this novella is interesting in how it wraps up the mystery of events and persons through telling the story through a limited perspective. The details focus on characters and their complexities, which makes sense when the big reveal is how these complexities are the driving point to why Dr. Jekyll seeks change. This is classic horror — tense, crying children, don’t go in a dark room, horror. So, read it if you haven’t. What this book does very well is establishing universal motivations in what would otherwise be despicable people. The main character, Dr. Jekyll’s friend and lawyer, wants to see Jekyll happy and rational. Jekyll struggles with his humanity and wants more than anything in the world to not struggle anymore. Isn’t that what we all want?

The Book Would Have Ended a Lot Sooner If: Dr. Jekyll had my chemistry skills. (aka NONE.)

Adaptation:

Like any classic, there are many adaptations that have come since. Here is one of my favorite “Mr. Hyde’s”.

From the film The Mask (1994).

What’s your favorite adaptation?

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